Welcome to Arizona


State in the southwestern United States. It is bordered by Utah, New Mexico, Mexico, and, across the Colorado R., Nevada and California.

Area, 113,909 sq mi (295,024 sq km).
Pop. (2000) 5,130,632, a 40% increase since the 1990 census.
Capital and largest city, Phoenix.
Nickname, Grand Canyon State, Copper State.
Motto, Ditat Deus [God Enriches].
State bird, cactus wren.
State flower, blossom of the saguaro cactus.
State tree, paloverde.

The state's principal crops are cotton, lettuce, cauliflowers, broccoli, and sorghum. Cattle, calves, and dairy goods are, however, the most valuable Arizona farm products. Manufacturing is the leading economic activity, with electronics, printing and publishing, processed foods, and aerospace and transportation leading sectors. High-technology research and development, communications, and service industries are also important, as are construction (the state is rapidly growing) and tourism. Military facilities contributing to Arizona's economy include Fort Huachuca, Luke and Davis-Monthan air force bases, and the Yuma Proving Grounds. Testing and training with military aircraft and desert storage of commercial and military planes are both major undertakings. 

Arizona abounds in minerals. Copper is the state's most valuable mineral; Arizona leads the nation in production. Other leading resources are molybdenum, sand, gravel, and cement.

Between 1940 and 1960, Arizona's population increased more than 100%, and since then growth has continued. By the 2000 census the cumulative increase since 1940 amounted to more than 1000%, and Arizona was ranked among the fastest growing states in the nation. The mountainous north, however, has not shared the population growth of the southern sections of the state. Over 80% of the people are Caucasian and nearly 20% are Hispanic.   

*Information from Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition


Tips for Finding the Perfect Neighborhood


1. Make a list of all of the amenities that are close by in the neighborhood you are considering as your new residence.  Keep in mind what distances and routes to each of these places are acceptable and what are not.

2. Determine what the best features of the neighborhoods are.  This is especially helpful if you are deciding between a few different neighborhoods.

Are there parks nearby?
Is it scenic and visually appealing?
Are there quiet areas, streets, culs de sac?
Are the people friendly in the neighborhood?
Is the neighborhood clean?  Yards, streets, parks?
Are there nice trees and foliage?
Do the lots have large or small yards?
Are there walkways and are they easily accessible?
Is it a safe neighborhood?
What are the market values of the homes in the area?
Are there many houses for sale?
How long ago was the community developed?
What is the average age of the people in the area?
Are there families with small children in the area?
What is the proximity to schools?
Are there community events or organizations?

3. Walk and Drive around in the neighborhood.  The best way to determine the cleanliness and friendliness of the neighborhood is to walk around in it and meet its residents. Drive the neighborhood at different times during the week and weekends to get a better feel as to what go's on and the amount of traffic the neighborhood get.